About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
CNNW 18
CNN 4
MSNBCW 4
KPIX (CBS) 3
KTVU (FOX) 2
KQED (PBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 45
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to com
and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before pa
with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the i
precautions to protect the ambassador. jon: u.n. ambassador susan rice has been under fire for weeks for her public response to the attack. the ambassador calling it spontaneous and not linking it to terrorism in and several television interviews. however, dianne feinstein is coming to the ambassador's defense, saying that the talking points she was given were wrong. >> i do not believe the intelligence communities should prepare these talking points. i think additionally somebody should have picked up the phone and called and said, tell me the story, what happened. jon: congressman rogers is not convinced. he suggests that someone in the obama administration simply try to change the story. >> it really is beyond the talking points and susan rice. it was a political narrative designed not around what the intelligence said, but what about the best politics were for them. jon: joining us now to help break this down is bret baier. the interesting thing in one of those sound like i'm jim -- the interesting thing in one of those sound bites is what she should have talked about on morning televisi
and not in syria? a lot of people asked me, isn't syria like what happened in bosnia and so many, including u.n. officials have said what's happening in syria is very similar to what happened in bosnia with the wholesale slaughter of innocent civilians. i think from the administration's point of view they're looking at iraq and they don't want to get into an iraq-type of multi-year operation. >> and former senator george mitchell has said the united states needs to stay out of syria while senators mccain and lieberman said thursday that the u.s. must get involved. what is the fear if the u.s. does get involved? >> well, precisely that. that they don't want to get bogged down. nobody is talking about putting american boots on the ground or any other boots on the ground. the question is, can you take other military measures that will stop this war? i think what you have now, most sort of seasoned observers and most people who look at what could possibly be done to mitigate this nearly two-year war now in which more than 40,000 people, men, women and children have been slaughtered and after nearly
? election coming up? what happened in the u.n.? what's the feeling there? >> well, certainly the israelis have made no secret of the fact that this is a direct punitive measure for what happened at the u.n. last thursday where, of course, the palestinians managed get an upgraded status there in the u.n. general assembly going to nonmember observer state. of course, the word state there is the operative one for the palestinians. the palestinians now say they do, in fact, have a state which is a taertory that is defined as the west bank, gaza, and east jerusalem. so, therefore, the palestinians are saying that this obviously would make the implementation of this state all but impossible because they say it would be impossible for them to even reach their capital that they want to have, which is, of course, east jerusalem. this is certainly a measure that's cause aing lot of international controversy. you were saying that great britain and france have already put out staunch statements aimed at the israelis. the israelis are saying, yes, all these countries have voiced their concern. they're
by the u.n show the opening day event in due by. delegates will update a treaty that applies to how phone calls are exchanged internationally. critics say it would be a mistake to apply the old standards to the age. . >> the internet is privately managed and it is crazy to bring back old school telephone regulations and apply it to the vibrant network. >> in a statement posted to the u.n website even before the conference began, the secretary general said the conference is not about giving governments control of the web. >> it must be to ensure communication technology including the two-third of the world population currently not on-line. >> critics say the conference raises a specter of china and russia replacing innovation and openness with sensorship. and while the u.n maintains this is not about controlling the web. analysts say the conference appears to be a steady part of the drip drip that under cuts free do. in washington, fox news. >>> tragedy overshadowing the duchess of cambridge's baby joy. we now have a picture of the british nurse who is believed to have taken her own life f
. then this is the first time that foreign minister met with hillary clinton on assad, met with the u.n. mediator and we're being cautioned this is no break through but there will be follow-up meeting. seems some u.s. officials russia is hedging its bets or beginning to see a future without assad. >> i think that's the case. we've talked about this before, but there is a russian card to be played, to be played by russia itself. they have influence with president assad, they have interests in syria, and i think that they can see the handwriting on the wall that assad is eventually going to go, whether it's in the near term, long term, eventually he's going. you can see the shift in momentum as far as the rebels now starting to gain much greater military success than they have in the past. they've been weapons that have been able to take some helicopters out of the air, shoulder-fired missiles, et cetera. i think they can see the shift taking place and want to be in a position to help negotiate some sort of an acceptable ending to this where they can play the role of a peacemaker. so i think not with stan
, the foreign policy team. >> we saw this joking moment, let me replay it, a news conference to push the u.n. treaty on disabilities which -- >> which is going to -- may fail. >> which is unbelievable since america has been -- >> very surprising. >> way out front since the days of bush '41 and tom harken was the big -- >> bob dole. >> and john mccain today made a plea for bob dole who is in walter reed he wants to see this great moment, a worldwide standard, it would be good for business, but as you pointed out on the daily rundown today, the chamber of commerce supports this, selling wheelchairs -- >> around the world. >> and here, it's stalemate. it needs two-thirds, more than 60. this is a treaty. because it has u.n. attached to it -- >> going to say it's brand, it's about brand. >> at that moment with mccain and john kerry because of foreign relations issue and this is the way mccain sort of gigged john kerry and kerry teased him back. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> thank you very much, mr. president. >> and there was a lot of joking after that. a lot of laughing. >> we should
to turn back today and the u.n. announced a short time ago it's pulling out all its nonessential staff from the country amid security concerns. >>> an appeals court is hearing the case of former bart police officer who killed an unarmed man in 2009. officer johannes mehserle appealed his conviction in the death of oscar grant. grant was detained by bart police during an altercation was shot and killed. mehserle already served his two- year prison term for involuntary manslaughter but wants to clear his name. lawyers for grant's family will argue against overturning the conviction. >>> the high court delays a decision whether it will review the case of prop 8, california's ban on same-sex marriage. >> cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran spoke with legal experts today so, cate, what's the delay mean? >> reporter: the supreme court's next conference to consider pending appeals will be this friday. and legal experts told me that pushing this decision back really will have no difference in the grand scheme of things. >> it's like well we have so many cases on the docket let's put it off until next
that the north is testing a ballistic missile technology and violating u.n. resolutions and further destablizing the korean peninsula. so many hot spots in the world today to watch as we welcome you on this friday morning to a brand new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. bill: i'm bill hemmer welcome to you at home. good morning to you, again, martha. we're watching the second launch attempt since kim jong-un took over after his father's death a year ago. the last try failed. here is the head of the u.s. pacific command keeping a watch on this. >> we're approaching once again a potential violation of a u.n. security council resolution and we encourage and the leadership in north korea to consider what they're doing here and the implications on the overall security environment own the careen peninsula as well as in asia. martha: molly henneberg is live. north koreans may have run into a snag with this launch plan which may be biding some time. what can you tell us about it? >> reporter: martha, a weather snag. snow may have slowed north korea's efforts to put the missile together
? >> reporter: norah, it's a sign of a possible diplomatic breakthrough. u.n. envoy to syria is flying here to dublin for this last-minute meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton and the russian foreign minister. it may signal that russia is finally willing to take u.n. action to send a message to bashar al assad to stop the killing. russia one of syria's few remaining allies and so far have agreed to any interactions to stop the killing of thousands of people. >> charlie rose here. the reporting that they're mixing the ingredients for chemical weapons influence what the russians may be doing? >> reporter: the russian foreign minister says that the outside russian government -- syrian government assures them that they are rumors. russia wants to be part of what comes next. if clinton can get russia to support at the u.n. security council, they could have sanctions that would cut seary off from any outside support. >> where does the violence stand? >> reporter: charlie we're told that rebels surround the city of damascus which has been an as assad stronghold.
signs point to u.n. ambassador susan rice as the top contender but republicans. >> signs of backing off their opposition whether or not she would survive a nomination fight is anybody's guess. >> don't know whether he should take on fight north. i know this. that what has happened to susan rice is unfair. >> i don't think she will be nominated. but i've told people certainly i will give her a fair hearing. i do think that the underlying issue here is people have seen her far more as a political operative and not a principal. >> jimmy williams joins me now from our d.c. bureau with more on why this fight over rice matters. so it was written in the chicago times hillary clinton preferring john kerry. hilary is not close to rice who is tough but not the friendliest person. hilary's brief comment recently that rice had done a great job was considered underwhelming and tepid. if that's true, jimmy, how does john kerry compare to her personality? >> i think what you're seeing here, this has virtually nothing to do with the next secretary of state. and to think that we just finished the electi
for u.n. affairs at the national security counsel at the time of the genocide. the rwanda genocide. now, that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time, it was a working level staff position. her first in government. ambassador rice could make announcements, but wouldn't be involved in making such an important decision about getting involved militarily in rwanda and president clinton said he made the decision. it was the greatest mistake of his presidency. and susan rice traveled to rwanda shortly after the genocide and said seeing the horrors of rwanda, the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what actually made her passionate about the issue of preventing genocide in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she returned when she became u.n. ambassador, spoke about that experience and there's also a quote from her in the book reference by rabbi shmuley in which she swore that if she ever faced a crisis like that again, she would argue for dramatic
and the u.n. special envoy to syria. as you know, russia has blocked action against al assad at the u.n., but some have speculate that had moscow may be considering a different aprove. i mean, is russia stopping the u.s., do you think, from going into syria? >> i think the russians are beginning to realize that this problem simply cannot be ignored, and their passive stance on it simply doesn't provide for any constructive solution, so i hope that they will work with us on this, and i think the more international consensus we have on what is to be done, the less likely is the danger that the removal of the regime will result in the fragmentation of syria all together and regional conflicts erupting. that is the real danger, and that's what people should be concentrating on. >> you know, some have made the comparison that getting involved with syria or in syria is similar to us getting involved in libya and taking action against libya. do you see it that way? >> not quite. i supported strongly the position that the united states took on libya because there was an identifiable enemy, and
, isn't syria like what happened in bosnia? and so many, including u.n. officials have said what's happening in syria is very similar to what's happened in bosnia with the wholesale slaughter of innocent civilians. but i think from the administration's point of view, they're looking at iraq and they don't want to get into an iraq type of multi-year operation. >> and former senator george mitchell has said the united states needs to stay out syria, while senator mccain said they need to get involved. what is at stake? >> they don't want to get bogged down. nobody is talk about putting american boots on the ground. the question is can you take other military measures that will stop this war? i think what you have now, most seasoned observers and most people who look at what could possibly be done to mitigate this nearly two-year war now in which more than 40,000 people, men, women, and children have been slaughtered and after nearly two years of this administration saying, you know, the assad must step down, and it not happening. the best one can hope for, perhaps, is that some kin
is holding an unscheduled meeting in ireland with russia's foreign minister and the u.n. special envoy to syria. a sign russia may be switching sides to put pressure on syria to stop the fighting. in dublin covering talks, margaret, good morning. do you think this is a sign of a diplomatic breakthrough? >> reporter: norah, the sign of a possible diplomatic breakthrough. flying here to dublin for a last-minute meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton and the russian foreign minister. it may signal that russia is finally willing to take u.n. action to send a message to bashar al assad to stop the killing. one of april saud's few remaining allies and so faro posed action to intervene the crisis that killed nearly 40,000 people. >> margaret, charlie rose here. has the report that david martin has, the story that david martin has reported that they're mixing the ingredients of chemical weapons influenced what the russians may be doing? >> reporter: well, the russian foreign minister said that the assad government assures them that the reports that syria is readying chemical weapons a
by the regime and the u.n. says more than 2.5 million people have been forced from their homes. blasts like this have become commonplace in places across syria, but the red line has always been the use of chemical weapons by assad's forces. >> we have set an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line and those responsible would be held to account. >> if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> held accountable. it's unclear exactly what that means, but what about military intervention to stop the assad regime. >> the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be consequences. there will be consequences. if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their own people. >> i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we would do in the event of credible evidence that the assad regime has resorted to using chemical weapons against their own people. but suffice to say, we are certainly planning to take action, if that eventuality were to occur. >> a p
forward with democracy and in fact, the u.n. rights official was slamming credibility of egypt's new constitution? >> yeah, well, there's a lot of political rhetoric here, but let's remember that when parliamentary elections were held some months ago, the muslim brotherhood and radical groups got three quarters of the seats and morsi himself in the run-off election won to be sure and both of those were characterized as free and fair, but it's also clear that fighting in the streets isn't exactly a democratic process either and i think that the military does not want to get back in the business of government, but they're not prepared to see the chaos continue. >> ambassador for those of us living in the united states and the western world and not really fully understanding what this draft constitution is, relate it this way. when the activist warned that if this constitution a passed, cairo will truly become kandahar with a blessing of the egyptian president and the muslim brotherhood referring to the home city. and is that at the heart of this and demonstration that is we're seeing n
with russia's foreign minister and syria's u.n. peace envoy to try to negotiate a peace strategy. they reportedly met for about 40 minutes in dublin to talk about how the start of political transition. this comes after defense secretary leon panetta warned syrian president may be considering using chemical weapons. yesterday reports surfaced that syria is loading chemical weapons into bombs. >>> a longtime face of the conservative movement and a tea party favorite is stepping down from congress. south carolina senator jim demint is stepping down. he's decided to do so at a time when the movement needs strong leadership. republican south carolina governor will select a replacement for that seat. she will not appoint herself. >>> police arrested a school aide of inappropriately touching three students. it happened at the maryland school for the deaf at columbia campus in howard county. 37-year-old clarence taylor is fising three counts of child sex abuse now. the girls say taylor touched them several times when he worked an evening shift as a dormitory aide between 2008 and 2010. t
secretary of state hillary clinton plans to meet with russian diplomats and a u.n. peace envoy for syria. the civil war ramped up in recent days with violent attacks and the u.s. fears syria's leader bashar assad is closer to using chemical weapons against anti-government rebels. >>> a new warning about a baby recliner titled to several infant deaths. >> plus, new tires, gps upgrades? the tricky way state lawmakers got taxpayers to fix up their personal cars. >>> and an amazing rescue under water how a group of scuba divers helped free a giant pregnant whale shark when we come back. ,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, they cut off a thick rope tt had wrapped itself around te animal's body .. the whale k is 33 feet lon >>> a group of scuba dives in mexico rescued a pregnant whale shark. they cut off a thick rope that this wrapped itself around the animals' body. it could have been months or years. there's barnacles on the rope. the whale shark is 33 feet long. it weighs 15 tons. whale sharks are the largest fish species in existence. despite their size, they are considered harmless to humans. they
don't think 100%, soledad. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security council at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what made her passionate about the issue of preventing again side in the future. she realized this was a wrong decisionadministration. she spoke about that experience. and there's also a quote from her in this book reference, in which she swore if she ever faced a crisis for that again, she would argue for dramatic action and go down in flames. >> so then why -- w
led by the u.n. special envoy to syria. >> the united states stands with the syrian people in insisting that any transition process result in a unified, democratic syria in which all citizens are represented. a future of this kind cannot possibly include assad. >> the syrian conflict is also aif he canning the region now. beyond the fears of chemical weapons being used, today the jordanian armed forces returned fire after several shells fired from syria landed in their territory and wounded a soldier. up next back here, big earthquake hits the same japanese coast devastated by last year's massive quake, and what the white house is considering doing that could prevent colorado and washington state from enacting those new pot laws. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. go ahead, mark your
. why the senate would vote down a u.n. treaty to support universal rights for the disabled. but they did, 38 senators voted no. some of the so-called facts about the treaty are simply fabrications. ahead on the program, pretty spirited discussion. i interview one of the senators who voted no. senator mike lee. i confront him about those facts. also former u.s. attorney general dick thornburg, a republican, who has a disabled child and still holds out hope the treaty will pass. >>> plus, a legal battle to tell you about over 21-month-old child named talia. her mother gave her up for adoption without the father's knowledge or permission while he was away from home serving in the military. now he wants talia back. the child's fate hinges on a judge's decision. we'll tell you how the why you ruled and speak with talia's dad. those stories and landmark cases making it to the supreme court. it will decide the issue of same sex marriage. all that ahead along with the "ridiculist." >> "360" coming up in ten minutes. >>> our fifth story "outfront" tragedy in london. a nurse at the h
that was negotiated by republican president george herbert walker bush. it was signed by george walker bush at the u.n., and republican attorney general richard thornburg has testified the former attorney general of the united states, there's no legal requirement whatsoever for the united states to change anything. rick santorum was just not factual. what he did, he gave some people here an excuse to hide behind that when they know that there are people who hate the united nations, who don't want any united nations treaty. and so they gave them a reason to be able to say this is why i'm voting against it. we're going to come back with the hearings next year, again that will show people exactly what the facts are. we'll have all the witnesses in. i think it can be december positive. and ultimately, i would be prepared to put into the treaty language of the resolution of ratification language that can make it more clear than it is today if that will satisfy them. >> the other argument that some of these republicans were making at least to me privately over the past few days, when i was beginning to get
will be meeting with her russian counterpart and that u.n. envoy talking about syria. the u.s. and russia have been on opposite sides of that conflict in sirah -- conflict in syria. however today's meeting is suggesting a possible compromising. all of this comes as fox news reports, the syrian military is mixing deadly chemical weapons. the syrian government has not confirmed they have these weapons, saying only it could not use -- it would not use that type of weapon against its people. president obama has warned of serious consequences if the syrian government uses those chemicals in that civil war. >>> allegations of spying on the high seas. the america's cup controversy involving the oracle racing team. >>> and we're looking live outside of traffic. that's the bay bridge toll plaza. tara is coming back, one more commute look. >>> in about 30 minutes a hearing will get underway in san francisco to determine the fate of a pit -- pit bull that attacked a u.s. park patrol officer's horse. the horse named stony was bitten by a pit bull named charlie at crissy field back in august. animal offici
. without having to go through congress were without having to get ratification of the u.n. treaty. megyn: it is another system. it looks kind of like cap-and-trade from what i'm reading. where have you, and west virginia, if you want to have a certain number of coal power plants come you have to trade -- there can only be one toll number of omissions and the states have to work it out amongst themselves. >> that is unlikely to go into effect. it would be too hard to pull that out. that is what this group is talking about. the epa really doesn't need to worry about that. they can just crack down on industry on their own. congressman stutzman, and there are enough democrats bases that may join with republicans to push back the epa. in all likelihood, the president found the sweet spot where he can go out there and his team can go out there and really crack down on carbon emissions and deal with global warming, but do it in a way that doesn't require approval. megyn: what happens if you violate the new epa standards? reporter: the people that run the plants will be fined into oblivion. it w
at state where she doesn't have a good record and her u.n. record is not good. we don't have time to go through the particulars, but i think senator kerry would not only be the policy and political wiser choice. >> everything i've read about ambassador rice, she's imminently qualified for the job. >> you guys can continue this conversation at home right now. thanks to both of you for joining us. >>> the royal line of succession could soon be adding a new name. britain is buzz right now over the news the royal family is about to add another member. ll t in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. >>> catherine duchess of cambridge is pregnant. cnn's royal correspondent max foster is at the epicenter of the madness that's going on right now. the hospital where the duchess has been admitted with acute morning sickness. max, give us the latest. >> reporter: well, i think we're going to be here for months now, wolf. but certainly the kucduchess of
assad will use the weapons on his own people. former u.n. ambassador john bolton had this to say about the very dicey situation. >> i think it's far more likely he's threatening the opposition and basically either for negotiating purposes or because he thinks he's close to the end of the line, he's making it clear he's getting ready to use his ultimate weapon to increase his leverage. but i would not put it past assad to use this weapon. he's perfectly capable of doing it. it's the kind of regime he's been leading these past several years. >> gretchen: fox news learning the minimum tear drawing up contingency plans in case assad suddenly leaves syria. >>> another day, another blow to the tsa. exclusive report in the new york post reveals tsa screeners are doing their holiday shopping on the job? actually they're doing it not on the computer, they're doing it in your luggage. according to the report, 32-year-old sean henry was busted for stealing ipads and laptops from checked luggage at jfk airport in new york. police say it was part of a sting into the growing problem of screeners wit
with the russian foreign minister and the u.n. mediator in syria today in brevlin. >> let's talk about those meetings. >> you can be sure that this issue of chemical weapons will be at the top of the list. >> no question about that. what are the options there? what can the international community do at this point if, in fact, they are already in a position where they're loading these components on to the weapons? >> well, one is this public message from the united states, from the nato secretary general and from the russians. the syrian government, including assad personally, will be held accountable. second is perhaps to see if the russians can use their influence. they're the big egest arms supplier to syria, the biggest ally that syria has, to dissuade the syrians from letting this chemical weapons loose or using them against the rebel alliance. if assad should fall and there's a chaotic period of time where no one is in charge of the government in damascus, if one of those radical rebel groups gets control of chemical weapons, that could be potentially very, very dangerous and that might
that is occurring and they're now too afraid to return. u.n. secretary general ban ki moon visited this refugee camp in jordan, this is yesterday, and or own cnn's ivan watson is in a sprawling refugee camp on the border with turkey. >> reporter: we're in a camp of around 7,000 syrians on the edge of syria. these people, some of them have been waiting a month, two months to be allowed into turkey. turkey says its refugee camps are full right now. these people have been supplied tents. they get about two meals, hot meals, a day, but everybody here complains that the water is seeping into their tents, and none of these tents really have heat either, so you can see how people are trying to heat up their tea and water, making fires right outside these shelters. now, this is just a fraction of the hoards of people who have been displaced by the conflict in syria. we don't really know the numbers of displaced people inside syria. the united nations says close to half a million have been pushed outside of the country to neighboring countries, like iraq, lebanon, turkey, jordan. the united nations secretary
for syria back on track, a u.n. effort that's stalled for so many months now. there's not a lot of hope it will get back on track anytime soon. a lot of international powers and pressure being put on syria to try to comply with some sort of peace plan so this nightmare scenario doesn't come to any sort of fruition. zoraida? >> all right, we're talking about a deadly nerve gas, it is sarin. can you tell us what kind of damage could this do to the people there? >> reporter: it's well known that sarin and the use of sarin is a nightmare scenario. the use of it could kill a huge amount of people in a very short amount of time. now, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporte
as the u.n. envoy to syria. with so much concern about the threat of chemical weapons at this point, do you think there are any diplomatic options left? >> i think the play -- and hillary clinton met twice today with russian foreign minister lavrov -- is to get russia in the tent with the rest of the world. everyone has predicted, when facts on the ground change, russia will be there. this could be a reset moment for vladimir putin, and he could, because of his unique sway in the area, persuade, i would think, the bashar family to step aside and create a peaceful transition, like the transition in yemen. the opposition is now more broadly representative, and i would hope the russians would see that being on the wrong side of this just creates more carnage, more opportunity for terrorists to get traction there and won't help russia. >> it's a pivotal moment, as we say, a clear tipping point. glad you're back safe and sound from egyp. jane harman, thanks so much for coming in. the jersey shore about to meet the fiscal cliff. grim news for governor christie as he visits washington. >>> plus th
. >>> anybody wants to go over the cliff. >> the new concerns the country is headed for the fiscal cliff. n [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow, you guys have it easy. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah blah blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no. we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real? your generation has it made. [ male announcer ] the wireless receiver only from at&t u-verse. get u-verse tv for $29 a month for six months. rethink possible. >>> ra little bit of patchy fog -- a little bit of patchy fog. mostly sunny, partly cloudy. rain returns to the north bay on tuesday. >>> all right. we have some breaking news. buckingham palace says prince william and the duchess of cambridge are expecting a baby. their first. ever since they got married, there's been speculation about when they would have their first child and the duchess has made it no secret that they with like to have a fami
news... we're talking about money, politics.... and why the u- s is suddenly 'very' disturbed about a dangerous new development in syria.. but first.. the 9-1-1 calls have been released from this weekend's murder-suicide involving n-f-l player jovan belcher. the kansas city linebacker shot and killed his girlfriend, the mother of his three-month-old daughter, before killing himself. >> the latest fatal tragedy involving an n-f-l player began saturday morning. >> dispatcher:"shooting, 5401 crysler .. incident .. 22-year-old female." >> "i believe our suspect is a chiefs player." >> "ok, i've got two coaches, one other employee here who's trying to beg with this guy." >> "we've got shots fired .. (noise) self-inflicted, one in the head, get in here." >>catherine: it's clear what happened: police say chiefs linebacker jovan belcher shot his girlfriend kasandra perkins, the mother of their three-month old daughter, multiple times, then drove to the team's training facility and shot himself in front of his coach and general manager. but why remains unanswered. within hours, the team and
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)